The New York Times’ recent opinion piece on education explores how the pandemic is helping us to think about students and education in more holistic ways. Schools have had to pivot quickly and many have responded in incredible ways, but what has become glaringly evident is that focusing on rote learning and standardized education leaves the more human qualities behind. Relationships are critical for deep learning and engagement.

Read more here.


College enrollment in 2020 has dropped by more than 20% for first year students and more than 30% for students in high poverty areas. Experts are concerned we may be losing a generation of students.

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Recent test data of 4.4 million US students positively shows online learning has had little impact on reading and has only somewhat slowed gains in math. Unfortunately, nearly 25% of students didn’t take the MAP test this year, and these students are “more likely to be black and brown, more likely to be from high-poverty schools and more likely to have lower performance in the first place.”

Read more here.

According to NPR, some doctors and public health advocates say there are powerful arguments for in-person schooling, particularly for younger students and those with special needs.
“Children under the age of 10 generally are at quite low risk of acquiring symptomatic disease,” from the coronavirus, said Dr. Rainu Kaushal of Weill Cornell Medicine. And they rarely transmit it either. It’s a happy coincidence, Kaushal and others said, that the youngest children face lower risk and are also the ones who have the hardest time with virtual learning.

The pandemic is negatively affecting schools in many ways. They aren’t just experiencing shortages due to cuts in state spending. They need funding to: feed children and families in hard-hit communities, help millions of students make up for learning time they’ve lost while home, and make sure schools are safe when children do finally return to class.

https://www.npr.org/2020/05/26/858257200/the-pandemic-is-driving-americas-schools-toward-a-financial-meltdown?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20200531&utm_term=4606025&utm_campaign=ed&utm_id=46790351&orgid=278&fbclid=IwAR1ra0_QZqlSwNmkBzz_opeYfgRa1YouPA6KB8Cf6o-eFESy9puWMaeyG3w